Blog

Filter Blog by:

Blog

Young Adults are Still Adults: Helping Your Children Enact Important Legal Documents

Published by Dan Morrison 

Over lunch recently with an attorney friend of mine, I was lamenting an age-old issue: I pay the bills for my college-age kids, but because they are over the age of 18, they must GIVE ME PERMISSION to see their school files, grades, etc. This is due to something called the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Read more

Blog

The Link Between Balance and Wealth

Published by Ryan Cooley 

In today’s world, we are often reminded to strive for a balanced life. Doctors encourage us to eat a balanced diet. My mechanic recently balanced the new set of tires I purchased to make sure they wear evenly. I even coach my son’s baseball team on the importance of having proper balance while they are batting to harness the most power. One thing I do not hear discussed as frequently is maintaining proper balance with finances.

Read more

Blog

How Emotional Decisions Can Ruin Your Investment Strategy

More money is left behind than lost during market declines. When an investor reacts emotionally to declines, they often pull money out of the market, derailing their investment strategy and leaving them much less exposed to equity markets. Often, these moves are made very near the bottom of the market and the investor leaves behind a substantial portion of return. Read more

Blog

When Can You Retire?

Not surprisingly, one of the most common goals financial planners help their clients with is analyzing cash flow in retirement so they can live their lives comfortably without worrying about outliving their money. Cash inflow in retirement can come from many sources (Social Security, retirement plans, savings, annuities, pensions) so it’s important to consider how much and when to expect cash inflows. Read more

Blog

Mortgages and the New Tax Code

Published by Dan Morrison

As a note, those planning on tapping equity for college expenses for children or grandchildren will also need to reconsider their options. While taxes can’t be the only factor in any decision, they are a crucial component to your overall financial picture.

Read more

Blog

Are Mutual Funds Right for You?

Published by Ryan Cooley

Most of us have heard at one point or another that mutual funds are an easy way to invest when desiring instant diversification. While this may be true, I have listed a few things you should consider when determining if mutual funds are right for you.

Read more

Blog

What Keeps You Up At Night?

Published by Mark Ring

Are you worried about how fast the world moves? Or, how quickly life can change? Does the unknown make you anxious? If so, do you find these thoughts affect your decision-making process, specifically how you manage your finances? This feeling may cause you to have “paralysis by analysis,” the inability to decide on the necessary action steps to provide you the best life going forward.

Read more

Blog

Why Diversified Investments Are Crucial

Published by Tyler Schlumpf

There are two main types of risk involved in investing: systematic and unsystematic risk. The first, systematic risk, is the general market risk all investors take when they buy stocks and bonds. Unsystematic risk, however, comes in many different forms. Specific company, credit and liquidity risks are just a few. While systematic risk cannot be diversified away, unsystematic risk can through diversified investments. Read more

Blog

How Much Do I Need to Retire?

Most people plan to leave the workforce at some point in their life.  While some have a desire to maintain a sense of purpose by working well into their seventies, we more often find ourselves helping people plan for an earlier departure. Achieving financial freedom, or the ability to work because one wants to and not because one needs to, takes time and thoughtful retirement planning.  Read more

Blog

A Lesson in Money; Is It Too Tough?

Published by Ryan Cooley

I recently heard a story on the news that raised a lot of criticism.  It was about a mother who was teaching her daughter about money.  She charged her 5 year old monthly rent that was to be paid using a portion of her allowance.  Upon collecting the $5 rent, she was then depositing the money into a savings account for when her daughter is older.

Read more