5 Reasons Not to Put Off Financial Planning

Share Post: facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.

Published by Christina Hester Snyder, Associate Partner and Wealth Advisor

 

For many people, managing their finances is stressful and overwhelming, which often leads to procrastination or avoidance of financial decisions or organization. We get it. Whether it be insurance planning, filing taxes, or putting together an estate plan, most people don’t find the nitty-gritty of financial planning the most exciting of topics.

But just because it’s boring doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be done. Delaying completing these tasks can be costly—in time, energy, and money. If you’ve been putting off your financial plan, consider these 5 reasons why you shouldn’t.

1. You Might Not Be Saving As Much As You Should

The first reason you shouldn’t put off financial planning is that you may not be saving as much as you should. That’s not to say that the savings you do have shouldn’t be celebrated. But no matter the amount you have, you need to be sure it will be enough.

If you plan to retire in your mid-60s, your retirement savings may need to carry you through 30+ years. Not to mention rising inflation that will decrease the value of your savings over time and the additional expenses you will likely encounter along the way. A study by the Center for Retirement Research estimated that the media retirement savings of Americans age 55-64 is $120,000,[1] yet the average retirement cost is nearly $46,000 per year![2] At that rate, a savings of $120,000 will only last 3-4 years.

The best way to avoid running out of money in retirement is to work with a financial professional to understand what your savings can handle. Contrary to popular belief, you cannot use a multiple of your annual income to determine how much to save. This is why it’s so crucial to plan ahead. The sooner you understand your need, the more options you will have and the easier your goals will be to pursue.

2. Healthcare Costs Are on the Rise

If you’ve ever held a hefty medical bill in your hand, you aren’t alone. Healthcare costs in America are among the highest in the world.[3] And as you age, you will likely require more healthcare services. According to the Fidelity Retiree Health Care Cost Estimate, the average couple at age 65 will need about $300,000 saved to cover healthcare costs in retirement.[4] Most people don’t even have that much in their retirement accounts to live on, let alone cover medical costs.

Given the events of the past two years, it’s more important than ever to start preparing for the ever-increasing cost of care. The longer you wait, the less options you’ll have. Working with an experienced professional can help you evaluate your options and work towards building a long-term plan for healthcare.

3. Tax Strategies Take Time to Implement

Another reason not to put off financial planning is that if you don’t start early, you’ll miss out on several tax strategies that take years to implement, including:

Tax-Advantaged Retirement Savings

If you’re in a high tax bracket, being able to save for retirement with pre-tax dollars is a great advantage because pre-tax contributions reduce your taxable income and ultimately reduce the amount of taxes you owe. This strategy could save you thousands of dollars in taxes each year. The earlier you start, the more you’ll save over the course of your career.

Roth Conversions

Roth conversions help to increase your retirement savings and decrease your long-term tax liability by transferring funds from a pre-tax retirement vehicle (traditional IRA) to an after-tax account (Roth IRA). This allows your money to grow tax-free for as long as you’d like, and required minimum distributions (RMDs) are avoided as well.

Withdrawal Strategies

When it comes to withdrawing from your retirement accounts, how you take your distributions can make all the difference. Each retirement asset (employer-sponsored accounts, Social Security, traditional IRAs, etc.) has different tax characteristics. Creating a withdrawal strategy can help lower your tax burden by structuring withdrawals from each income source in a tax-efficient way.

To properly implement these strategies and more, a long-term understanding of your full financial picture is required. Putting off financial planning can leave you stuck with a huge tax bill that could have been avoided.

4. Compound Interest Requires a Head Start

Just as saving early allows you to take advantage of massive tax savings over time, there is a compound effect that occurs with the money that is actually invested as well. The money contributed to your retirement account each year will grow exponentially over time, but the key part of that equation is time.

A single penny that doubles every day for a month may not seem like much on the surface, especially when compared to $1 million up front. But by the time the 30th day rolls around, you will have over $5 million in pennies. This same concept can be applied to your retirement account, but because retirement investments are at the mercy of the highs and lows of the stock market, it will take more than 30 days to see that kind of growth.

If you wait to invest, you are missing out on growth year after year, and the resulting loss of earnings can be substantial. Not to mention the potential for loss when you try to invest yourself without the proper advice and guidance of a professional. We’ve found that many clients are often invested too conservatively and miss out on the opportunity for significant growth in even just a slightly riskier portfolio.

5. Financial Planning Can Alleviate Stress

Do you feel 100% confident about the myriad of financial choices you make day in and day out? Have you encountered more complexity as your assets have grown? Partnering with a financial professional may help alleviate the stress and anxiety that comes from trying to figure out your finances.

Think about all the time you spend worrying over finances and whether you are saving enough money. Are those thoughts preventing you from making great memories and actually living your life? For many of our clients, the answer is yes. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Financial planning may help alleviate the stress that comes from not knowing where you stand or how to pursue your goals. It may provide clarity by defining a path from point A to point B, and allowing you to get the most out of your life along the way.

Don’t Wait Any Longer!

As you can see, there are many reasons to start the financial planning process sooner rather than later. If you have long-term financial goals like buying a house, planning a wedding, or saving for retirement, working with a professional is one of the best things you can do to work towards setting yourself up for success. Don’t leave your most important goals and priorities to chance. At Jacob William Advisory, we will build a custom plan to put your money to work for you, so that you may feel confident in your financial future. Contact our office by calling 410-821-6724 or emailing info@jacobwilliam.com or schedule an appointment at https://www.jacobwilliam.com/insights/#contact.

 

About Christina Hester Snyder

Christina is an Associate Partner and Wealth Advisor at Jacob William Advisory with a storied 20-plus year career in financial services. Christina is known for her commitment to her clients and is dedicated to helping them alleviate their financial fears through education and planning that goes far beyond investments. She believes in a comprehensive approach that addresses all facets of planning, including wealth transfer, insurance, taxes, investments, estate and trust planning, retirement, risk management, and business planning. Christina graduated from the University of Baltimore with a Bachelor of Science in Business with an emphasis in international business. She also holds many professional designations, including CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, Chartered Financial Consultant® (ChFC®), Retirement Income Certified Professional® (RIPC®), and Certified IRA Services Professional (CISP). She is an active member of her community and is involved in many professional and nonprofit groups, including acting as the president of the Maryland chapter of Women in Insurance & Financial Services and serving on the board of a nonprofit that helps Maryland families with financial hardships. To learn more about Christina, please click here.

 

Converting from a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA is a taxable event.

The hypothetical investment results are for illustrative purposes only and should not be deemed a representation of past or future results. Actual investment results may be more or less than those shown. This does not represent any specific product (and/or service).

[1] https://smartasset.com/retirement/average-retirement-savings-are-you-normal

[2] https://www.financialsamurai.com/the-average-spending-amount-in-retirement-is-surprisingly-high/

[3]https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/072116/us-healthcare-costs-compared-other-countries.asp

[4]https://www.fidelity.com/viewpoints/personal-finance/plan-for-rising-health-care-costs

Share:
facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.
Share Post: facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.

RECENT POSTS

Do You Need Help Consolidating Old 401(k) Accounts?

Published by Daniel Morrison, Founding Partner and Wealth Advisor   Staying with one employer for your entire career is now a relic of the past. American workers will have an average of 2.9 jobs between the ages of 35 to 44, and 1.9 jobs between ages 45 to 52.[1] Because you switched jobs s …

Paying for Health Care in Retirement

By Ryan Yamada, Senior Wealth Planner    When putting away for retirement, we often dream about all the things we’ll be able to do with that money – traveling, going out to eat, maybe trying new hobbies. 

Senate Addresses Taxes, Deficit, Inflation, Health Care in Proposed Bill

By Jamie Hopkins, Managing Director, Wealth Services  Sonu Varghese, Director, Investment Platforms; and Ryan Detrick, Chief Market Strategist, contributed to this report.    Senate Democrats have reached a general agreement on a bill to address climate change, taxes, health care, inflation …

Quarterly Market Outlook: What Lies Ahead for the Third Quarter of 2022?

By Scott Kubie, Senior Investment Strategist    The first half of the year proved challenging for even the most hardened of investors. High inflation. Continual losses in the S&P 500. Bear market. Fed rate hikes. It all added up to the third most volatile market in 25 years.  
1 2 3 111 112 113

Get in Touch

In just 15 minutes we can get to know your situation, then connect you with an advisor committed to helping you pursue true wealth.

Schedule a Consultation